(No) Banana Man

My walk to work in the morning used to take me round the corner or Sukumvit and Thong Lor. Everyday (ok well nearly everyday) I would walk past breakfast- stalls piled high with fried rice, fried noodles, rice porridge and other dishes, all ready to be put in a white box or a plastic bag and taken away. Busy people jostled about, their money ready, only to pay and then become the slowest walker ever as they continued up the street, me following closely behind trying to overtake on the right, no on the left, no ok the right… desperate to overtake somehow.

In amongst all this were two of my favourite sellers of breakfast. One was a lady who sold toast. Oh.. but not just any toast. This was delicious barbecued bread. Once the bread had been sufficiently browned over hot coals, it was covered in margarine and then dusted with sugar, or drenched in sweetened condensed milk. Cut up into triangular squares, I would take the sweet sticky bready mess and devour it later on.

Next to her was another barbecue. This guy was selling little banana leaf parcels, neatly held together with a cocktail stick at each end. One day I bravely asked for two, ‘ow sorng na ka’ and squirrelled them to work to find out what they were. To my delight, inside one was sticky rice and something sweet, mushy and lavender coloured (I later found out this was taro). To my disgust, I bit into the other one and… banana.

I.Hate.Banana. With a passion. Ewww. Yuck. Gross. Euuuuuurgh. I mean really.

So, from then on, in my bid to avoid banana poisoning and get the ones I liked, (and because I can be damn determined when I want to be) I attempted.. Wait for it.. I attempted to speak Thai. ‘Mai chop gluaay’ – I don’t like banana. Simple, easy. I wouldn’t get the banana ones again.

Simple… pssht. Every time I attempted the phrase the man would look at me blankly, and put a few parcels in a bag. Every time I would get one banana, one taro… Of course ‘mai’ means a bazillion different things if you change your tone slightly, and ‘gluaay’ well who knows.

Everyday I would try again, say it a different way, draw out ‘gluaaaaaay’, say ‘mai’ high pitched, say ‘mai’ low pitched. No avail. I tried English – ‘No banana’ – and…recognition! ‘Banana?’ he would say, and when I got it back to the office – two banana parcels.

A few months ago I changed jobs, turning my morning walk round the corner to a 25 minute train ride. I also, as it happens, began to officially learn Thai language. My breakfast, however, became something from 7Eleven, or a pastry from a self service bakery. Talk about boring.

This morning I left an hour early for work as I had to go to the bank near my apartment (and I never know how long things will take when they involve me speaking Thai). As I walked back, I saw ‘Banana Man’ as I had since affectionately called him, standing in his usual spot, blue apron on, tongs in hand, midway through rotating all the little parcels so they were evenly and perfectly cooked. I stopped in front of him, smiled, and said ‘No banana’, in English, wondering what the outcome would be.

He smiled back at me. ‘Banana?’ oh no not this again. ‘No, no banana’ I repeated. Confusion. He screwed his face up. Then, out of nowhere, ‘No banana? Uhhh! Mai chop gluaay’, he said. ‘You no like banana. You like taro’.

Cue jaw drop.

Ahh Samet…

Samet, it’s been nice to  kick back and relax,

Heather Randell

next to the familiar sound of the waves that I miss.

I like your palm trees and coconuts,

Heather Randell

and how you invite people to spend time together.

Heather Randell

You’re beautiful!

I hope to see you again soon!

© Drawing Cows in Bruges

City of Angels

Here are my first few snaps in Bangkok using film on my Recesky! A little bit pricey for developing unfortunately… however, film is awesome.  I love how the focus in the city scape makes it look fake, and the trees almost look plastic… or is that just me?!

This last picture is a ‘Spirit House’. These are everywhere in Thailand, and offer a place of residence for spirits – they are also appeased by being given offerings of food, incense and other things. Belief in spirits form a big part of Thai culture, which I should know more about really….. I aim to catch up on reading a lot more books about Thai culture!

Hope you like the pictures….

Hev

x

Recesky

So… it seems that actually there are a lot of toy cameras around Bangkok. MBK has quite a lot, I actually got of the skytrain to fall over a tiny little shop called ‘Holga’…

*ahem*

Sells cheap film, so got a few rolls… to put in this baby…

…which I just bought. It’s a Recesky TLR, and I completely geeked out and made it from a kit, using only a pair of tweezers… as I had no small screwdriver to hand!

So now I get to experiment!